Illustration by Tim Morris (Pristichampsus on DeviantArt)
Illustration by Tim Morris (Pristichampsus on DeviantArt)

credit to Tim Morris (or Pristichampsus on DeviantArt)

Illustration of a sisiutl by Kwakwakaʼwakw artist Richard Hunt

The Naden Harbour caddy carcass

Illustration by Tim Morris (Pristichampsus on DeviantArt)
Illustration by Tim Morris (Pristichampsus on DeviantArt)

credit to Tim Morris (or Pristichampsus on DeviantArt)

Caddy

Cadborosaurus willsi

Caddy is an unknown aquatic mammal that inhabits the fjords and inlets off the coast of British Columbia, as well as Washington and southeastern Alaska. “Caddies” are about 25 to 30 feet long, with two flippers at the front and horizontal whale-like tail flukes at the end. They have long serpentine bodies with smooth skin like a seal. Their heads are elongated, with an unusual muzzle, sometimes being described as resembling a horse or camel. They are also occasionally reported to have manes. They seem to prey on fish and occasionally seals and are known to occasionally break fishing nets. Reports of Caddy go back thousands of years into First Nations folklore. The Kwakwaka'wakw tribe, for instance, describes a very similar creature they call the Sisiutl.

An example of a Caddy sighting was in 1933 by a Victoria Lawyer and his wife on a cruise in their yacht. They described seeing a "horrible serpent with the head of a camel“ rise out of the water and look at them for a couple of seconds before diving down. A whaling station in northwestern Queen Charlotte Island caught and killed a sperm whale in October of 1937. While removing the stomach contents at the Naden Harbor whaling station, they came across a twenty-foot long carcass of an unidentified creature. It had a horse-like head, a snake-like body, and a finned, spiny tail. Two photographs were taken, but no one knows exactly what happened to its remains. Dr. Edward Blousfield, retired chief zoologist of the Canadian Museum of Nature, analyzed the photographs, and compared it to all known fauna in the area, and concludes it to be an unidentified species.

One of the more detailed accounts of Caddy was by Captain Paul Sowerby in 1939, who said "We were headin' North, and, about thirty miles offshore, and saw this thing standing about four feet out of the water. So, I headed over towards it and took a look at it. At first, I thought it looked like a polar bear with its ruffles of hair. When we got right up alongside of it- and the water was crystal clear- there was just this column of this thing going at least forty feet and huge eyes. I had an old Newfoundlander as a mate and he said 'Do you see eyes on him?' Mouth and nose I have no recollection of at all, just those great big eyes. And the eyes seemed to open from top to bottom.”


In 2009, Kelly Nash filmed an alleged Caddy in quite good resolution and detail. In total there are 9 alleged videos/photos of Caddy and there have been over 300 sightings since 1933, although it is likely there are many more but are not reported due to fear of ridicule.