Tusk-Pig

The “Tusk-Pig” is an unknown boar-like species allegedly inhabiting northern Manitoba. The environment the tusk-pig lives in is an area of rolling hills with lakes, wetlands and rocky outcrops.


The cryptid was first described by John Warms in 2015, although locals have seen it much earlier. It's reported to be pig-like in basic form, with flat, round tracks lacking a split-hoof, and black skin, but not as thickly coated with hair as a wild boar. They have a seven-to-eight-inch horn protruding from the end of the snout. Habitat-wise, it seemed to be found in swampy areas. Presumably, this animal is not actually in the pig family, as pigs don’t have hooves or horns.


One sighting was by Dennis Dumas, a trapper from Pukatawagan, who was visiting his trapline when he awakened an animal that was resting on the shore of a small lake. He noted the animal’s long horn on its snout, small bristly hairs on its body and strange flat tracks, like the heel of a shoe.


Multiple people in Split Lake in northeastern Manitoba have reported finding large circular tracks which they likened to frying pans.


It was said in John Warm’s book, Strange Creatures Seldom Seen, that he interviewed several other witnesses, but did not describe them. The cryptid may be a relict population or descendant of the Pliocene pig-sized rhino Teleoceras, which inhabited Manitoba 4.9 million years ago.

Dennis Dumas's sketch of the animal

Dennis Dumas's sketch of the animal

Teleoceras reconstruction by Mark Marcuson

Teleoceras reconstruction by Mark Marcuson